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While wrinkles and fine lines are a normal part of aging, they can make the skin appear tired and impact self-esteem, especially for women. You can prevent premature wrinkling by avoiding the sun and taking proper care of your skin, but wrinkles caused by genetics and aging are not avoidable.

Causes Of Fine Lines & Wrinkles

There can be many causes of wrinkles and fine lines including:

Sun exposure: Sun exposure is the most common cause of skin damage and wrinkling. Exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight causes changes to the skin. In addition to fine lines and wrinkles, UV damage causes brown spots and pigment irregularity, as well as broken capillaries and red blotches. All of these changes make the skin look older.

Smoking: It is considered one of the worst habits you can have. Smoking negatively affects your health and skin causing it to age early. Research has shown that people who have never smoked have less wrinkles than smokers.

Age: With the passage of time, your skin starts to age. Wrinkles are a natural part of the aging process. However, they typically begin to appear once you reach your mid-twenties to early thirties.

Hormonal changes: When our hormones are out of balance, we are more likely to develop dry skin, fine lines, wrinkles, acne and rosacea. also, as we age, the hormones that help keep our skin looking firm and vibrant, decline and lead to sagging and wrinkles.

Sleeping position: Your sleeping pattern can also be a surprising cause of wrinkles, especially on your face. Sleeping in a particular position for a long period of time can create permanent fine lines on the face.

Poor diet: If your body is not getting enough of the nutrients that are required for the proper development of your body, you may experience early wrinkles.

When Wrinkles Start to Show

20’s: In your twenties, the skin responds to antioxidants less, making it more sensitive to damage caused by oxidative stressors. If that wasn’t enough, your skin also becomes drier. This is due to a leveling out of hormones…though you may still endure pimples and breakouts.

30’s: Once you reach your thirties, the creation of collagen slows. This makes the skin appear thinner and less full. Additionally, skin will continue to feel dry, it may become sensitive, and the undereye area will be more delicate. The latter opens you up to more notable lines around the eye area. You may also start to notice visible wrinkles on the forehead.

40’s: By your forties, things change even more. The life cycle of skin cells slows, which can dramatically affect your appearance. Other skin changes include a loss of elastin, adult acne, and increased sensitivity. (These issues are linked to lower levels of estrogen in the body.) You’ll see deeper lines around the eyes, mouth, and forehead, along with age spots.

50’s & 60’s: In your fifties, sixties, and above, skin will continue to thin and dry, with lines becoming deeper and age spots more visible. According to a study on the effects of estrogens on skin aging, women lose a third of collagen during the first five years of menopause.

Common Types of Wrinkles

There are many areas where wrinkles may start to appear. A few of the most common include:

Eye wrinkles tend to be the first sign of aging people notice. In your twenties and thirties, things like crow’s feet, tear troughs, and bags underneath the eyes become more visible. You can combat them by paying attention to skincare sooner rather than later.

Forehead wrinkles can also appear early on, thanks to everyday facial expressions and repeated muscle movement. They typically stretch horizontally across the forehead but may be vertical as well, forming between the eyebrows.

Lip wrinkles are common once you reach your mid to late thirties. Lines around the mouth develop naturally as you age but can be seen earlier (in your twenties and thirties) if you are a smoker.

Treatment Options:

Laser Treatment
Neuromodulators
Dermal fillers
Medical Facials
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